Archive | November 2014

No-Knead Dinner Rolls

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Who out there has found a recipe, followed it to the letter, and thought part way through that it would be a total disaster?

When I made a no-knead roll (perfect for Thanksgiving) I was positive it was doomed to failure. The initial dough mixture resembled paste and was impossibly sticky. I was hoping to make a dinner roll that was flaky and delicate, but I was left with dough that was so sticky all I could do was messily plop it into a greased muffin tin. While I felt incredibly defeated, certain I had made one flop of a bread, I just tried to finish and make a roll that was at the very least edible.

I’m so incredibly happy I followed through with the recipe instead of tossing it, as I ended up with a roll so delicate, slightly crusty, buttery, and flaky it completely melted in my mouth. My initial misgivings about the recipe entirely disappeared as I enjoyed a roll, fresh out of the oven, which was one of best carbs I’ve had in months. Best of all, these rolls are great to make ahead, then freeze, then let defrost before serving.

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Dinner Rolls

Adapted from Pioneer Woman

  • 4 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 9-10 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 packages (4 1/2 Tsp.) active dry yeast (be sure you don’t use the instant or rapid rise kind)
  • 1 teaspoon (heaping) baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon (scant) baking soda
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt (if using table salt, use 1 heaping tablespoon)
  • 1 stick of unsalted butter

Pour 4 cups of milk into a large saucepan, stock pot, or Dutch oven. Add one cup of sugar and 1 cup of vegetable oil. Stir to combine, cooking over medium to medium-high heat, until simmering, but before reaching the boiling point. Remove from heat, and let mixture cool.

When mixture has cooled to approximately 100-105 degrees Fahrenheit, add 4 cups of flour and yeast. Stir to combine (I used a wooden spoon). Once mixture has partially come together (don’t worry, it will still look very clumpy), slowly mix in 4 more cups of flour (again, don’t worry, it will look like a disaster). Let rest in a warm spot, lightly covered with a lid or dish towel. Let rise for 1-2 hours, or until doubled in size.

Meanwhile, divide stick of butter in half. Use half of the butter to generously grease 24 muffin tins. Set aside the remaining half of butter.

Once dough has doubled in size (the top of the mixture will look poofy and slightly bubbly), vigorously stir in 1 additional cup of flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. At this point your dough may still be impossibly sticky. If so, slowly stir in additional flour, up to 1 cup more. The dough may still be very wet and sticky, but that’s okay.

Divide dough evenly between the muffin tins (you’ll want the dough to come close to coming level to the top of the muffin tin) (again, don’t worry if you have to messily plop the dough in, it will be lovely once it’s risen and baked), lightly cover with a dish towel or lightly greased saran wrap, and let rise for and additional hour, or until rolls have puffed.

Right before baking, melt remaining half stick of butter, and lightly brush over the top of the rolls.

Bake in a 400-degree oven until golden brown, about 17 to 20 minutes. Rotate the pans 10 minutes into baking.

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Pepper and Orange Cranberry Sauce

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Cranberry sauce has to be one of my favorite condiments. On Thanksgiving, a holiday full of delicious, but often rich food, the tartness of cranberries does a great job of cutting the heaviness of turkey, stuffing, gravy, and mashed potatoes. I’m still a bit obsessed with the lime and ginger cranberry sauce I made last year, but wanted to spice things up a bit this year.

The spiciness and savory aspect jalapeno and pepper bring to this cranberry sauce is most welcome at the dinner table. Extra bite and spice further enhances the cranberries’ ability to lighten up Thanksgiving dinner. Just enough sugar balances out the spice and tartness, but this is still a very bright and fresh tasting condiment. I promise this isn’t excessively spicy, but if you’re worried about too much heat feel free to reduce to just one jalapeno. And if spice really isn’t your thing at all, removing the pepper and jalapeno entirely results in a very pleasant traditional cranberry sauce.

Pepper and Orange Cranberry Sauce

  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 2 jalapenos
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 1/4 cup water
  • 1 orange
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 16 oz cranberries, fresh or frozen (if using frozen, let defrost)
  • Pinch of salt

Seed bell pepper and jalapenos; chop the pepper into a small dice and finely mince the jalapenos. Add to a large sauce pan, pour in water and sugar, cook over medium-high heat for approximately 8-10 minutes, until peppers have softened. Meanwhile, zest the orange, then juice the orange. Rinse the cranberries then pick through and discard any all white cranberries or mushy or shriveled cranberries.

Once peppers have softened, add the orange zest, orange juice, ginger, cranberries and salt. Reduce heat to medium and cook for 15 minutes, or until most of the liquid has dissolved and the cranberries have mostly burst, with a few remaining whole. Let cool before serving.

This is a great make ahead recipe. If covered tightly and refrigerated it should stay for a minimum of two weeks.

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Mushroom and Leek Stuffing

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Many of you may already know, but for anyone that doesn’t know, I am totally and madly in love with carbs. I want to marry carbs. I want to spend my life with carbs.

I cannot get enough of carbs. They’re probably my favorite food group and whether I’m chowing down on a crusty baguette, eating bowl after bowl of pasta, or enjoying each and every grain in a huge bowl of rice, I cannot resist carbs.

It should come as no surprise that my favorite part of Thanksgiving is stuffing (aka dressing). How could anyone not be crazy about a dish that celebrates bread? I would be completely okay with simply eating cubes of plain bread goodness, but I know most people like their stuffing/dressing to have a bit more substance.

This Mushroom and Leek stuffing is absolutely delicious. An abundance of mushrooms makes this a substantial and almost meaty dish, while leeks give a delicate onion flavor and pancetta gives a salty bite. You can’t go wrong with any form of stuffing/dressing, but I highly recommend this one.

Just a few notes:

  • Stuffing deserves good bread! Cubes of generic, white bread are nowhere near as good as a loaf of rustic style bread. Treat yo self!
  • Serving stuffing in a large casserole dish (or 9 x 13 dish) is probably the most common, but why not divide into individual ramekins?
  • Feel free to cube bread into 1 inch pieces, but I like ripping the bread into comparable sizes. It looks more rustic and I think has superior texture than a cube.

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Mushroom and Leek Stuffing

  • 1 lb rustic bread
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/3 lb pancetta, chopped into a small dice
  • 2 leeks, white and light green parts only, thoroughly rinsed and thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 lbs crimini mushrooms, chopped into quarters
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus additional for greasing pan(s)
  • 1 tablespoon minced sage
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  • 1 1/2 cups low sodium chicken broth
  • Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit.

Rip up a 1 lb loaf of rustic bread into approximately 1 inch pieces (you want about 8-10 cups). I don’t even bother removing the crust as I think leaving the crust adds a greater variety of texture. Spread bread pieces on a baking sheet and bake in preheated oven for approximately 20 minutes, or until nice and dry.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium to medium high heat. Add pancetta and cook for 8-10 minutes, until fat has rendered and pancetta is nice and crisp. Using a slotted spoon, remove pancetta and place into a large bowl.

In the same skillet used to cook pancetta (leaving the rendered fat from the pancetta), add prepped leeks, and cook for 8-10 minutes, until tender and lightly browned. Remove with a slotted spoon and add to the same bowl the pancetta is in.

In the same skillet, add in quartered mushrooms and butter. Cook for 10-15 minutes, until mushrooms are tender and have released any liquid. Add to the large bowl containing pancetta and leeks.

Once bread is done baking and is pale but very crispy, add to the large bowl of pancetta, leek, and mushrooms and stir in chicken broth, sage, and parsley. Add salt and pepper to taste. Mix well (and taste again for seasoning!). Crank up oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

Using additional butter, lightly grease 8-10 individual ramekins (depends on how big yours are, mine are slightly larger than 1 cup), or one large casserole dish/9×13 pan. Divide stuffing between ramekins or pour in the stuffing mixture into casserole dish.

If using individual ramekins, bake uncovered for 35-40 minutes, or until top has crisped up. If baking in a large casserole dish, cover with aluminum foil, bake for 25 minutes, then remove foil and bake an additional 20-25 minutes.

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Butternut Squash Soup

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While this butternut squash is comprised of incredibly simple ingredients, the taste manages to be quite intricate and rich. Roasted squash and apple create complex flavors while caramelizing onions and shallots mellow out typically harsh and intense ingredients. Besides some sage, salt and pepper, a bit of olive oil and butter, and a healthy amount of stock, there’s not much else to this recipe. A splash or two of heavy cream at the end can make this already velvety smooth and decadent soup a bit more indulgent, but it’s completely optional.

What I enjoy about this soup so much is the simplicity creates a perfectly balanced dish that’s delicious as is, but can be punched up in flavor, if desired. Seriously, this soup does not need any elaborate garnishments, but if you were so inclined, toasted pepitas would be a fantastic addition, as would some drops of hot sauce, drizzle of crème fraiche, chopped chives, salted cashews, or candied pecans.

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Butternut Squash Soup

  • 1 Butternut Squash (approximately 3.5 – 4 pounds)
  • 1 apple
  • 1 sweet onion
  • 1 shallot
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 6 cups low sodium chicken broth
  • 8-10 fresh sage leaves
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream (optional)

Prep ingredients by peeling and seeding the butternut squash, coring the apple, and peeling the onion and shallot. Chop squash and apple into approximately 1-inch dice. Place on a rimmed baking sheet, drizzle with 2 tablespoons olive oil, and sprinkle with 1 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Roast in a 400 degree oven for 30 – 40 minutes, or until tender and golden brown, stirring once or twice during the process.

Meanwhile, approximately 10 – 15 minutes into the cooking time of the squash, in a large saucepan or stockpot, melt butter over medium-low to medium heat, chop shallot and onion (medium dice) and sauté with butter until caramelized, about 15-20 minutes. Add chicken stock and sage leaves and bring to a simmer. Once squash and apples are done roasting, add to stockpot and cook for a few minutes.

Blend mixture in batches in a blender or food processor, or puree with an immersion blender. Simmer mixture for a few more minutes, just to ensure the flavors meld. Season to taste with salt and pepper. To make this richer and creamier than it already is, finish off by stirring in the heavy cream (optional).

I garnished with some sour cream thinned out with a bit of milk and a light sprinkling of cayenne.

Pear and Cranberry Cake

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Every now and then I overthink things. Deciding what to have for lunch is occasionally a three hour long process where I have to ask 20 people what I should have and by the time I’ve decided it’s practically dinnertime. Friends of mine all know they shouldn’t ask me what I want to do during a weekend, since my answer tends to be “I don’t know, what do you want to do?” While I can make important choices under pressure, in my day-to-day life I can sometimes be a bit indecisive.

Deciding on what to cook or bake can sometimes be a challenge as well. Do I go back to a favorite recipe I’ve made before that has exceptional results, or do I try something new and different? Yesterday when I couldn’t decide whether or not do something familiar or new, I decided to settle and I made a few revisions to a recipe I knew I loved.

Several years ago smitten kitchen posted a recipe involving browned butter, obscenely whipped eggs, and sweet pears juxtaposed against the bite of bittersweet chocolate. It was a cake that I loved to make and within 2 months of seeing the post for the first time I had made the recipe 5 or 6 times. I thought it was that good.

Now that the recipe is officially a go-to in my arsenal, I thought it might be time to update it a bit. Don’t get me wrong, the pear and chocolate combination is delicious, but considering Thanksgiving is just around the corner, I thought it might be appropriate to swap out the chocolate for fresh cranberries. Texturally, cranberries aren’t at all similar to chocolate, but taste wise the tart bite of the cranberries is a great substitute to the bitterness of chocolate. Despite the fact that fall spices are nowhere to be found in this recipe, a bite of it was quintessentially autumn, and I think this would be a perfect addition to Thanksgiving dinner, or any dinner for that matter.

If anyone is indecisive on what to make, I’ll help you with the decision…. make this!

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Pear and Cranberry Cake

Adapted from smitten kitchen

  • 2 tablespoons cornmeal (small grind)
  • 1 cup unbleached, all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder (yes, a tablespoon, that’s not a typo)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 large eggs, at room-temperature
  • 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 pears, peeled, in a small dice
  • 1 1/4 cup fresh cranberries, sorted and washed
  • Powdered sugar and whipped cream for serving

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter a 9-inch springform pan and dust with cornmeal (you could also use plain breadcrumbs or flour), set aside.

Using a stand mixer with the whisk attachment, whip eggs on high until pale and very thick (beyond ribbon stage). This should take a minimum of 8 minutes using a stand mixer, 10+ using a hand mixer, and I would imagine a very, very long time if whisking by hand.

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While the eggs are whipping, brown the butter by melting the butter in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Once butter has melted, it should start browning in approximately 4 minutes. Do not stir for the first few minutes, but once butter starts to bubble you’ll want to occasionally stir to ensure the solids don’t burn. You’ll know it’s done when it smells nutty and the white solids in the butter turn brown. Remove from burner but leave in a warm spot so butter doesn’t solidify.

Meanwhile, mix together the flour, baking powder, and salt together in a small bowl, set aside.

Add the sugar to the eggs and whip 2 more minutes, or until the mixture just starts to loosen. Reduce speed to the lowest setting, add one third of the flour mixture, half of the brown butter, a third of the flour, the remaining butter, and the rest of flour. Mix until barely combined, then lightly stir by hand with a spatula, to ensure all flour has been incorporated, being careful not to over mix.

Pour batter into prepared pan and lightly sprinkle the pears and cranberries on top.

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Bake in preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the cake comes out clean or with one or two tender crumbs.

Let cake cook completely, dust with powdered sugar (optional), and serve with whipped cream.

Due to the juiciness of the pears and cranberries, this cake is still moist on the second and third days, if it isn’t all eaten before then.

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(As if by magic, the cake rises over the pears and cranberries that were on top prior to baking)